Blog

So Much To Do: Tips and Tricks for Managing Your Time as a New Teacher

What do you do when there are only 24 hours in a day, but you really need 27? Whether it’s grading a stack of essays or organizing parent-teacher conferences, one of the most common complaints I hear from teachers or school administrators is that they don’t have enough time. This is especially true for new […]

Read More

The Results Are In: How Technology Affects Student Learning

Many of us take technology for granted, whipping out a tablet to write a quick email or pulling out a smartphone to look up driving directions. Even in the classroom, technology is more and more common: many rooms have LED projectors and document cameras, and an increasing number of schools give teachers the option of […]

Read More

Teaching Overseas: A New Adventure

If you’re the adventurous type, teaching overseas can be quite attractive. Not only do you get to live in a new place and culture, but you may also find yourself at a school with many more perks than your average U.S. institution. Benefits  Obviously, one of the biggest benefits to teaching overseas is that you […]

Read More

How to Get Started Teaching Classes Online

You may have read on our site about how to position yourself to get a teaching job. Those tips and tricks are a great starting place, but if you’re more interested in teaching online than in the classroom, you’ll want to read these additional pointers. Online courses, and the need for online teachers, are growing […]

Read More

Getting Your Teaching License: Know the Requirements

Getting your teaching license is exciting: it represents years of hard work and the chance to finally put to use the skills you’ve been developing. However, there are several steps you’ll need to take to do that. No Child Left Behind requires that all teachers be “highly qualified,” which means meeting three criteria: Find a […]

Read More

Teaching Salary Differences: What And Why

Teaching salaries across the U.S. can vary widely. As mentioned on our site previously the average educator makes close to $40,000 per year, but that figure can vary from $30,000 to close to $100,000 for experienced teachers. What you make also depends on which area of education you’re in, with college professors being the highest […]

Read More

The Basics of Proficiency-Based Grading

Traditional grading practices are the bread and butter of most teachers today. We’ve been assigning A’s through F’s for as long as anyone can remember, but some argue that this isn’t the best method for assessing what students know and can do. Proficiency-based grading, sometimes called standards-based grading, is taking hold in school districts across […]

Read More

Simplifying the Praxis Exam

If you want to get a teaching license, you’re most likely going to have to take the Praxis I Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). Typically just called the Praxis, this test is used in over 40 states to determine whether potential teachers have basic skills in reading, math, and writing. There are states that provide alternative […]

Read More

MOOCs: Massive Open Online Courses

As traditional universities and colleges expand their online course offerings, parallel offerings are also popping up. Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, are free courses on subjects ranging from biomechanics to Greek mythology. The most popular site, Coursera, has hundreds of classes taught by university professors. EdX and Udacity are also popular MOOC providers. As […]

Read More

Full- Versus Half-Day Kindergarten: Pros, Cons, and State Requirements

Full-day kindergarten, and the argument for this, has grown with the last decade’s increased focus on early childhood education. While during the 1990s, most children attended just a half-day of kindergarten, with some states not requiring them to attend at all, more children in the 21st century spend a complete day at school. It’s often […]

Read More